Adamic Awakening: Discovering Our Forgotten Identity

Adamic man has forgotten his story.  Revised history has taken us for a ride.  We’ve lost our identity whilst we are literally the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel. But there is of late a Caucasian consciousness – an Adamic awakening taking place.

We’re starting to remember our past, and in return we influence our future.

On the Expansions of Dan

via Adamic Awakening

Following consistent pressure from the Philistines, the tribe decided they’d relocate their territory and moved to the northeast reaches of the Israelite oikumene, conquering the city of Laish and taking it for their own (renaming it as Dan; Tel-Dan of archaeology). The rest of their fate parallels that of the rest of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

This is the core narrative of Dan’s story in the Scriptures. Now let us see what blanks can be filled in from other contemporary historical records. If Dan is seafaring, then what sea should we look to other than that of the Mediterranean spanning the west coast of Canaan? From the Iliad of Homer, we have a great war between the Pan-Hellenic Achaeans and the Trojans towards the end of the Bronze Age. Over 138 times in the Iliad, the Achaeans are referred to as the Danaans (Δαναοί, Danaoi), and are one of the four major tribes which into which the Greeks divided themselves (along with Aeolians, Ionians and Dorians).

In Egyptian sources, these Achaean Greeks are either referred to as the Denyen or the Ekwesh, both constituting the ‘Sea Peoples’ (a confederation of seafaring tribes that invaded Egypt in the Late Bronze Age). The Karnak Temple inscription records how Pharaoh Merneptah defeated several tribes in battle, one of whom being the Ekwesh. It is noted that when they were castrating the dead to record the numbers of the slain, the Ekwesh were found to have been in fact circumcised, a practise adhered to by the Israelites (though apparently later lost during their time in Greece.

 

Greco-Roman record even documents the origins of these Danaan Greeks, with their legendary patriarch known as Danaus. Greek mythology has Danaus flee from his brother, Aegyptus, who sought to marry Danaus’ daughters to his own sons. After Danaus fled Egypt he travelled with his daughters to Argos. Though mythological, there seems to be some underlying truth to this narrative of migration of Danaus’ progeny across the Mediterranean to Egypt. Recorded in Diodorus Siculus’ Library of History (.2) is a fragment of the Aegyptiaca by Hecataeus of Abdera. In it we find…

“All the foreigners were forthwith expelled, and the most valiant and noble among them, under some notable leaders, were brought to Greece and other places, as some relate; the most famous of their leaders were Danaus and Cadmus. But the majority of the people descended into a country not far from Egypt, which is now called Judaea and at that time was altogether uninhabited.”

Following this we find a rather respectable description of Moses as the leader of this Exodus, even if from a Greek perspective (.3-7). What we can deduce from this account by Hecataeus on the origins of the Danaan/Achaean Greeks, as well as their early observance of circumcision and seafaring nature, is that the biblical Danites and Danaan are either two coincidentally similar peoples both occupying the Eastern Mediterranean at the exact same time with near identical origin stories, or they are simply the same people who went two separate ways.

Due to the maritime ways of the Danites, it can also be speculated that they are the namesake of many of Europe’s waterways, especially those connected to the Black Sea: Danube, Don, Dnieper, Dniester, etc. It should also be noted that in Irish legend there was a mythical race known as the Tuatha Dé Danann (Tribe of Dan) who invaded the island in ancient time. The 12th Century Danish historian, Saxo Grammaticus, in his Gesta Danorum documents how the Danes owe their lineage to their eponymous patriarch, King Dan.

One way or another, the seas and rivers were the highways of the ancient world, and the Danites truly stayed in their ships.

Following consistent pressure from the Philistines, the tribe decided they’d relocate their territory and moved to the northeast reaches of the Israelite oikumene, conquering the city of Laish and taking it for their own (renaming it as Dan; Tel-Dan of archaeology). The rest of their fate parallels that of the rest of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

This is the core narrative of Dan’s story in the Scriptures. Now let us see what blanks can be filled in from other contemporary historical records. If Dan is seafaring, then what sea should we look to other than that of the Mediterranean spanning the west coast of Canaan? From the Iliad of Homer, we have a great war between the Pan-Hellenic Achaeans and the Trojans towards the end of the Bronze Age. Over 138 times in the Iliad, the Achaeans are referred to as the Danaans (Δαναοί, Danaoi), and are one of the four major tribes which into which the Greeks divided themselves (along with Aeolians, Ionians and Dorians).

In Egyptian sources, these Achaean Greeks are either referred to as the Denyen or the Ekwesh, both constituting the ‘Sea Peoples’ (a confederation of seafaring tribes that invaded Egypt in the Late Bronze Age). The Karnak Temple inscription records how Pharaoh Merneptah defeated several tribes in battle, one of whom being the Ekwesh. It is noted that when they were castrating the dead to record the numbers of the slain, the Ekwesh were found to have been in fact circumcised, a practise adhered to by the Israelites (though apparently later lost during their time in Greece.

Greco-Roman record even documents the origins of these Danaan Greeks, with their legendary patriarch known as Danaus. Greek mythology has Danaus flee from his brother, Aegyptus, who sought to marry Danaus’ daughters to his own sons. After Danaus fled Egypt he travelled with his daughters to Argos. Though mythological, there seems to be some underlying truth to this narrative of migration of

Due to the maritime ways of the Danites, it can also be speculated that they are the namesake of many of Europe’s waterways, especially those connected to the Black Sea: Danube, Don, Dnieper, Dniester, etc. It should also be noted that in Irish legend there was a mythical race known as the Tuatha Dé Danann (Tribe of Dan) who invaded the island in ancient time. The 12th Century Danish historian, Saxo Grammaticus, in his Gesta Danorum documents how the Danes owe their lineage to their eponymous patriarch, King Dan.

One way or another, the seas and rivers were the highways of the ancient world, and the Danites truly stayed in their ships.

[1] [2] [3]

 

 

Spartan and Judaean Kinship

1 Maccabees
²⁰King Arius of the Spartans, to the high priest Onias, greetings. ²¹It has been found in writing concerning the Spartans and the Judaeans that they are brethren and are of the stock of Abraham.

Josephus, Antiquities 12.4.10
“Areus, King of the Lacedemonians, To Onias, Sendeth Greeting. We have met with a certain writing, whereby we have discovered that both the Judaeans and the Lacedemonians are of one stock, and are derived from the kindred of Abraham. It is but just, therefore, that you, who are our brethren, should send to us about any of your concern as you please. We will also do the same thing, and esteem your concerns as our own, and will look upon our concerns as in common with yours.”

 

 

The Name of Christ

In the first chapter of Matthew’s Gospel, the angel Gabriel tells Joseph that his betrothed, Mary, will give birth to a son and that His name will be Jesus (Gk. Ἰησοῦς, Iésous) and that He has come to save His people from their sins.

²¹She shall give birth to a son. You shall name him Jesus, for it is he who shall save his people from their sins.

The beauty of what Matthew was trying to convey can only be ascertained once we understand Christ’s name in Hebrew, Yahshua (transliterated Joshua in the English OT), and what meaning this held to an Israelite in Judaea. Yahshua is a theophoric name, as a compound of ‘Yah-‘ (abbreviated form of the Tetragrammaton, YHWH – the name of the God of Israel) and ‘shua’ (meaning salvation or deliverance). The implied notion being that Yahweh God is our salvation, and was incarnate as an Adamic child to be the promised Saviour of His people (the dispersed White nations of the Abrahamic Covenant, cf. ; Mtt. ; etc).

[1] [2] [3]

 

 

Do you REALLY believe that the New Testament has nothing to do with race?

Much to the dismay of the universalists and judeo-churchians, if one were to only delve past the surface-level of their Christian scriptures, they would realise that genos (race), ethnos (nation) and sperma (seed/offspring) play an important function in the New Testament.

Only through obfuscation and word trickery in the translation process can our opponents ever succeed in removing these vital concepts from our scriptures, in the hopes that the Christian message can somehow be universalised and multi-racialised, to suit the will of the globalist churches and international jewry.

God has created us set-apart, and only the Wicked One is the author of confusion, who wishes to sow tares amongst the wheat. Study to show thyself approved. If anybody tells you that race is not a topic of Scripture, they either have conducted poor research, or are liars seeking to allow wolves into the sheepfold.

[1] [2]

 

 

11th century marble transenna panel with a swastika interlace design from Siponto, Italy.

Originally this marble panel and another similarly carved panel probably constituted a single large rectangular piece that served as a chancel screen. Remains of such double panels, some with carvings identical the one above, are found at Monte Sant’Angelo in Apulia, the location of a well-known fifth-century sanctuary and pilgrimage destination dedicated to Saint Michael, near the port of Siponto, which the Byzantines controlled from the late tenth to the late eleventh century.

An almost identical panel was discovered in a truncated state, built into an eighteenth-century altar in the Church of Santa Maria di Siponto. Excavations have shown that the eleventh-century church was built on the site of what was probably the baptistery of a fifth-century basilica, the original cathedral of Siponto.

In 1022 Siponto and Monte Sant’Angelo were elevated to a joint archbishopric of the Latin Church under Leone, who in 1049 hosted a papal synod at Siponto. It seems likely that the Siponto church furnishings, including a pulpit and an episcopal chair, were made for the basilica, which is known to have still been standing at that time, though it suffered an earthquake in 991. The church furnishings are generally attributed to the sculptor Acceptus, whose name appears on a marble beam found at Siponto and who signed an episcopal chair at Monte Sant’Angelo dated 1041.

The chancel panel’s interlaced running meanders and starburst palmettes, possibly of apotropaic intent, are closely related to those on the first-century dome of the Hulda Gates in Jerusalem and to the patterns found in Early Christian church floor mosaics, including those at Siponto. These similarities suggest that the Kansas City panel represents an eleventh-century replacement of the cathedral’s original chancel panels, which must have been damaged by the earthquake.

-The Glory of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Middle Byzantine Era, A.D. 843–1261

@AdamicAwakening

t.me/adamic-awakening

 

 

 

 

I write about philosophy, geometry, health, politics and other stuff that interests me.

What do you think?